Tag Archives: attitude

What’s Your Perfect Day?

If you could map out your perfect day, what would it look like? Would it include a walk in the first light of the morning, a breakfast of cappuccino and croissants, and hours of uninterrupted writing or studio time? Maybe an hour or two reading blogs, or a great book with a cup of tea by your side? Sitting in a café in the afternoon, writing poetry and listening to your favorite music, or lunch with a friend, catching up and ranting about the state of the world? Would it include a lovely dinner prepared by you or someone else, paired with the perfect wine? An evening binge-watching Netflix, or a great movie, alone or with a friend?

How close is any of your perfect day in relation to your reality? Life doesn’t allow for us to live every day in perfect harmony with our wishes, but how can we adapt our dreams and desires to better fit that reality? Life is fluid, always presenting hurdles, obstacles, changes, new responsibilities, and difficulties, and we have to work extremely hard to adjust. All too often, what we really want to do gets pushed to the bottom of our never-ending to-do lists, and the day ends before we get there. The day always ends before we get to the end of the list. And it always will.

What would it take to add the elements of your perfect day to your life? There always will be things we absolutely have to do, but don’t we deserve the opportunity to spend some of our short time here doing the things we enjoy, fostering our creativity, making things, connecting with other people, giving ourselves a reason to be excited about starting the day? Isn’t it time to put some of those things closer to the top of the list? Maybe a walk three times a week, or a trip to the café once a week, Friday night movies, and however much time that can be blocked off for creative pursuits every day. Whatever we can do to incorporate the components of that perfect day.

“How we spend our time is how we spend our lives.” I’m betting no one’s last words were “I wish I spent more time on Twitter”. Our time here is short, and you really don’t have to go out and slay dragons every day or be completing tasks every minute. Think about the things that are truly important to you, things that you would regret not doing. We have no control over time, but we do have control over how we spend it. Just be yourself, and make time for who you want to be.

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I Still Believe

I still believe that art can change the world.

I still believe creativity is the answer to living a better life.

I still believe that small acts of kindness can make a difference in the world.

I still believe that words are our most powerful tool.

I still believe in the inherent good of most of humanity.

I still believe embracing our differences does not divide us.

I still believe education is our hope for a better world.

I still believe that love is eternal.

I still believe there can be change if we stop being afraid.

I still believe that laughter helps us heal.

I still believe our differences bring us together.

I still believe that the energy we put out into the world is reflected back on us.

I still believe we can exist and respect our planet simultaneously.

I still believe that we can pursue our own happiness and peace without infringing on anyone else’s right to do the same.

I still believe that we are all equal regardless of our differences.

I still believe.

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Writer’s Block: Fact or Fiction

So many of the books written on the creative process try to convince you that there really isn’t such a thing as “writer’s block”. They’ll quote established writers from Ernest Hemingway to Stephen King, Agatha Christie to Joan Didion. All you need to do is show up every day, and just start writing. Sometimes it’s just crap and ends up in the trash, and sometimes there is some good in there that’s worth mining and exploring further. And I believe this to be absolutely true. Louis L’Amour advises “The water doesn’t flow until the tap is turned on.”

And there are many things you can do to stimulate the creative juices…establish a routine, take a walk, switch to a different medium, or read the work of others you admire. I’ve written previous posts about how to get that creative spark lit, about reinspiring yourself and training your brain to know when it’s time to get going.

But sometimes you hit that wall. And you hit it hard. You stare at that blank screen or page, you’ve tried all the tricks, you’ve rearranged and poked and prodded, you’ve begged for cooperation, you’ve paced and squeezed, and nothing. You can type words on the page. They’re flat and uninspired. There is no flow. You have no interest in what you’re writing, and neither will your readers.

I call this condition “creative constipation”. Forgive the analogy, but no matter how hard you squeeze, nothing is coming out. It can be traumatic when you write original content for a living, but there are times when you cause more harm than good by digging for gold in a mud puddle. It can also be tricky knowing the difference between “I don’t feel like working today” and “I can’t find the words”. Only you can tell the difference. When you’ve tried your best, when you’ve reached down to your very soul, when you’ve pushed yourself to your limits, and still nothing, it’s ok to just admit it’s not working right now and go do something that makes you feel good.

Taking the pressure off and walking away from the performance anxiety relaxes those overworked creative muscles and allows them to loosen up and recuperate. Writing every day without a doubt strengthens those muscles, and I’m a firm believer in pushing through most blocks. But just like any kind of exercise, knowing when you are doing more damage by pushing too hard can cause irreparable harm. It can make you avoid it because of fear and anxiety. It can keep you away for too long. It can make you question your abilities and your strengths.

Sometimes journaling (for your eyes only) can help you discover an underlying reason why things aren’t working. Are there distractions you need to attend to or feelings that you’re not addressing? Are you just feeling burned out?

Let the light back in and give yourself permission to take time for yourself. Fill that creative well back up again. Relax your brain. Read magazines. Plant something. Watch a funny movie. Take a day off from social media, which I highly recommend doing anyway, at least one day a week. Don’t waste precious time feeling guilty. Creativity is a fragile beast. It can be whiny and fickle and uncooperative. Show it some love, some attention, and some appreciation. Realize how lucky you are to have it. That wall you’re hitting is only right in front of you. You can keep trying to smash through it, you can try and scale it, or you can simply take a few steps back, give it the finger, and walk around it.

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You Are Your Greatest Work Of Art

You are free to do whatever you want. You need only face the consequences.”

-Sheldon Kopp, American Psychotherapist

How do you define yourself? Are you a Writer? A Photographer? A Sculptor, a Poet, a Painter, a Potter, a Yoga Master, a Chef? All too often, we describe ourselves awkwardly and tentatively, with a combination of explanations and disclaimers. It’s as if we don’t feel we deserve to use those labels. Our experiences have shown us that using them usually leads to being questioned with “Oh, have you written a book?” or “Have you had a show?” or “Do you have a YouTube Channel?” As if these were the milestones we need to reach in order to be considered worthy of the title. Imposter syndrome kicks in, and we suck those words right back up.

You have to want it, believe it, and own it. Who do you really want to be? Who are you now compared to that? What steps can you take to bridge that gap? What’s holding you back from being that person? You certainly don’t need anyone else’s permission or validation to be anything you want to be. There are obvious things that we cannot change, but we can change how we react to them. There are some changes that may take some time, but are you moving in the right direction? Can you envision yourself being that person and living that life?

Our capitalistic society is always pushing us to be more productive, accomplish more tasks, buy more material possessions, and fit in. The result is often anxiety, depression, exhaustion, and low self-esteem. Just maybe our to-do lists should include being authentic, being kinder and more supportive of other people, and respecting and valuing our own self-worth instead of just getting more tasks done.

You are the greatest piece of art that you’ll make in your lifetime. And each of us will always be a work in progress. Life changes and changes us in the process. Priorities shift, lessons are learned, goals are adjusted. Be careful not to lose yourself in the waves. Stay true to yourself, and it will show in your work. Create the person you want to be.

I’ll wrap this up with one of my favorite quotes from my mother, who always encouraged us to be whomever and whatever we wanted to be…

“Don’t be normal…normal is so boring.” -Selma Bersin

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Some Weeks Are Better Than Others…

Grant Snider

Petrea Hansen-Adamidis

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We Are The Documenters of History

We, the people, are the documenters of history. It is our stories, our artwork, and our photographs that future generations will look upon to get a true insight into our society. It won’t be Jeff Koons multimillion dollar balloon animals, nor will it be the latest best-selling novel, the current viral tweet or trending tik tok videos that they will seek out.

People are fascinated by the everyday lives and struggles of the “common” people. From the earliest cave drawings and logbooks of the first explorers, to the diaries of Civil War soldiers and a beautiful young soul named Anne Frank. From field sketches on the battlefields and poems scrawled on napkins to photographs tucked away in books. These are the words and windows we study to view what life was truly like.

The greatest artists and writers throughout history created works that have withstood the test of time. But we are just as fascinated by DaVinci’s notebooks and observations on life as we are with his creations. And the words of Charles Dickens are just as relevant today as they were almost 200 years ago. Truly great art survives, and so do the stories behind them.

But to dig even deeper, to see and read and feel what people were experiencing, how they were living and working, how they were reacting to what was going on around them, we turn to the “regular” people. The journals, the sketches, the photographs of everyday objects they put together for us. This is what allows us to get a true vision of their existence.

And that is why what we do today, by creating stories, by making our art, by documenting our experiences and lives and struggles and observations and reactions to what we see and hear, is so important. Document your reality. Your words matter, your art matters. Your journals, your blogs, your photography, your creations, they all matter. Your life matters.

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Simplify, Simplify, Simplify

I’ve spent the last several weeks examining and dissecting my life to see when and how it got so complicated. I had once again fallen into that trap of constantly pushing, rushing, trying to accomplish as much as possible every day, and the things I love to do, writing and drawing, had gotten relegated to the bottom of the list.

It’s so easy to get sucked into that whirlwind of productivity, the endless chores and commitments, the spinning on the wheel that gets us nowhere. The faster we try to finish everything, the faster more gets added to the list.

I have now prioritized and refocused, and with that came a huge sense of relief. The outside world can be crushing to a desired life of individuality and creativity.

When you feel like you’re losing yourself, when your joys and creativity are being stifled and suffocated, when you start putting yourself at the very bottom of your to-do list, it’s time to stand up for yourself and just say “hell no!!”

It’s not easy, but you’ll never regret it. The more we allow ourselves to thrive, to create, to be individuals, the happier, healthier and more successful we become. And the better we can be to and for the people around us.

Make yourself a list of 10 things you can do to simplify your life. Mine included going from 2 part-time jobs to 1 full-time, running errands only once or twice a week, and reducing the number of “things” I needed in my life. I purged my possessions and eliminated the clutter around me. It also included spending less time on social media.

Now make a list of 10 creative things you’d love to do. That’s your new to-do list. I’ve been dying to build something; a table, a shelf, anything.. I have a list of topics to write about, subjects to study, and drawings I’d like to do. I feel focused and excited again.

So what is it that you would like to do? You’re the only one who knows, and the only one who can make the decision to do it. No one is going to tell you that you should spend more time creating. That has to come from you.

You have to believe in yourself before others can believe in you.

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