Category Archives: writinglife

Every Small Step Is Progress

Where do you see yourself in 5 years? What would you like to accomplish by the end of the year? Or the end of the month? What steps will it take to reach those goals? These words echo in my head each and every day.

Setting goals is a major part of becoming who we want to be, but they can just as easily set us up for failure. Finding that middle ground, those attainable steps that push us forward, without burning us out in a month or leaving us too much time for doom scrolling and binge-watching. Not reaching that goal you set of 2500 words a day will not make you work harder. It will just stall out whatever progress you are making. Be kind to yourself and set goals that may stretch you, but you know you can do. Success fuels us to continued success and accomplishments to more accomplishments.

Many self-help books and articles will tell you to take your goals, break them down monthly, then weekly, then daily. Sounds simple enough. It’s a very defined, organized, check it off the list and move to the next item approach. Just one task after another. It’s structured, it’s orderly, and there’s not a lot of decision-making or creativity involved. Seems very logical. I, however, am not. I’m just not that deliberate. I sit down Monday morning, look at the list, and instantly decide I want to paint today (even though I had hours I could have done that the day before). Or clean the grout in the shower. Or take my car in for an oil change or do anything at all that’s not on that list, even if it’s something I’ve been putting off for years. It feels like someone is telling me what to do and I don’t want to do it, whatever it is.

I’ll be the first to admit, this is still a learning process for me. Right now, setting up my goals for the week has been the best method for me. I like to work on multiple projects at a time, and this allows me the freedom to do that. On Friday afternoon, I set up my list of what I need to accomplish the following week. That way, I do have some structure and deadlines, but it’s not so forced. When I’m not so “task oriented” I also remember to pay attention to what’s happening around me and take advantage of opportunities that present themselves. Spontaneous lunch with an old friend-absolutely! Although it’s not on my list, it’s creative input, and generates ideas for that next article about the challenges we are all facing these days. Knowing my goals for the next week also gives me the weekend to think about those projects, keep them floating around in my subconscious, and get excited about them. Taking notes of course because I inevitably forgot that great idea character name I just had an hour ago.

Reevaluating our aspirations regularly reinforces our motivation and helps us to see what is and isn’t working. It also offers insight into what is truly important to us.

Goals can make or break us. It just depends on how willing you are to be honest with yourself. What you think you should be able to do versus what you know you can do. Remember to keep your eye on the prize, whether it’s fame, fortune, artistic expression, or just making a nice life for yourself. One step at a time, however small it may seem, gets us that much closer. Just keep moving forward.

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Top 10 Books For Writers and Everyone Trying to Live a More Creative Life

Here’s my list of the top 10 books for writers, for those needing some inspiration, and for everyone who is just trying to add a little creativity to their life. There are many others that are worthy of your time, but I’ve scaled back my list to just 10. I’ve included links to amazon.com for consistency, and to make it easier to see more information on each title. As always, please support your local bookseller and independent bookstores like powells.com or bookpeople.com whenever possible.

On Writing ~ Stephen King

Part memoir, part master class, this is by far one of the most definitive books on the art of writing. Full of inspiration and practical advice from one of the true masters. Every writer should have this on their bookshelf.

Daily Rituals ~ Mason Currey

One of my favorite books to pick up and browse through, Daily Rituals is Mason Currey’s massive collection of habits, quirks, routines and rituals of individual writers, artists, scientists, inventors, and a host of other creative minds. Fascinating insight into the creative process.

Bird By Bird ~ Anne Lamott

Already in its 25th Anniversary edition, this classic is also a must read. Filled with advice, humor and wit, and layered with honest and personal stories of her life and journey as an author. You’ll find this on most Writing Top 10 lists.

Steal Like An Artist ~ Austin Kleon

I’ve included Steal Like An Artist, Show Your Work, and Keep Going all by Austin Kleon as a trilogy, but each book is worthy in its own right. Each contains honest, straight forward advice and solutions for everyone trying to make their way in the creative world. I refer back to all 3 frequently for motivation, inspiration, and help in resetting my goals and priorities.

The Elements of Style ~ Strunk and White

Included in many college writing curriculums, this classic guide covers everything from grammar and style to usage. A handy reference guide to have on hand.

On Writing Well ~ William Zinsser

Another fundamental classic that should be in every writer’s arsenal, this one focuses on writing clear, concise nonfiction. A must read for content writers, copywriters, grant writers and anyone who just wants to learn how to tighten up their writing.

No Plot? No Problem! ~ Chris Baty

Written as a guide to penning a novel in 30 days, this is an adrenaline fueled, kick in the pants push to get you motivated and just get the words out. A fun read, and great for anyone putting off writing that novel.

Things Are What You Make Of Them ~ Adam J. Kurtz

Life Advice for Creatives. A boost of support, motivation, compassion and inspiration on those days when you feel like no one is listening.

The Art of Noticing ~ Rob Walker

131 Ways to Spark Creativity, Find Inspiration and Discover Joy in the Everyday. Through a series of simple exercises, Rob Walker guides us through a reawakening of our senses, helping us to take note of the world around us. Perfect for both writers and artists, it points out all the things we tend to overlook, and teaches us to pay attention in new ways to the world around us.

Four Thousand Weeks ~Oliver Burkeman

This book will be released on August 10th, but I’ve included it in my Top 10 because I’m a huge fan of Oliver Burkeman’s past work. He addresses the entire “Productivity Crush” felt by creative people in all fields, and offers warm, heartfelt advice on time management, and the balance between productivity and creativity.

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It’s Your Life

Giving your creativity room to grow and flourish, both mentally and physically, is one of the greatest gifts you can give yourself. There is room in your home and your life, you just have to claim it. It just means getting rid of the clutter and junk that has been accumulating over the years in your surroundings and mind like the proverbial junk drawer.

Simplifying your life can be done to any degree that you’re comfortable with, from a complete purge and reboot to just getting rid of the trash lying around.

 It’s about living within our space comfortably and with room to move around. It makes our homes easier to clean, it’s easier to get to what you need, causes less anxiety, and eliminates that constant feeling of always needing to be doing something. That chair Aunt Ruth gave you when you got your first apartment, that you now must squeeze by every time you want to sit on the couch can be passed on to someone else. Those utility bills from 6 years ago, or copies of checks the banks used to mail you (remember those?) are taking up valuable real estate in your limited space. And the 10 candles that have to be moved to get to the extra printer paper are really not helping. Clothes that no longer fit and projects we never finished only make us feel bad. Free yourself of the burden of all the physical objects that have attached themselves to you and made you their guardian. I’m not advocating the “only keep it if it sparks joy” method, because frankly the toilet brush and handy little tool to unstick my garbage disposal really just don’t bring me joy. Keep what you love and need.

Cleaning up your finances also allows you more room to breathe and prosper. Take a good look at where your hard-earned dollars are going. Drop the subscriptions, services, and memberships you never use, shop around for the major monthly expenses like car and health insurance, ask your credit card company for a lower rate, or apply for one with better rewards, and please stop paying for long term storage of the lawnmower and yard tools, or bedroom set, until you get that house. Sell them and buy them when you need them. Try to make your banking and bill paying as simple as possible. With those extra few dollars at the end of the month, you can get to that museum, see that film, or have dinner with friends.

Technology can also suck up a huge amount of time if we let it. If we let it. Unsubscribe from those emails you never read, make a file for anything you’d like to read later, and handle or deal with the rest. Check it only as often as you feel you absolutely need to. There’s social media, the ultimate wormhole. It’s not downtime, it’s not creative time, and it’s not helping us to be better people. Time lost falling down the rabbit hole of social media is overwhelming. Arguing with strangers about leash laws or how often to water a cactus consumes so much of our time as well as emotion. Set a time limit, keep scrolling when something annoys you, and stop arguing with strangers that have nothing better to do than irritate others and look for attention.

Our time is one of our most precious assets, and limited in hours as well as in years. If you find yourself unable to take 15 minutes or an hour to do something you love, take a good look at where your time is going. Write down everything you do for a few days. Now be honest with yourself. If it’s important to you, make time for it. Allow yourself time with family and friends, for downtime and daydreaming, for adding input to your creative well, and for practicing your art. Life doesn’t always have to be about crossing things off of your to-do list. Unburden yourself of what you don’t want or need in your life.

Simplify, Simplify

-Henry David Thoreau

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It Doesn’t Get Any Easier, So Why Not Start Now?

You’ve got your notebook, you’ve got your passion, and now your final preparation is making that commitment to yourself. That’s right, to yourself. Everyone else gets your attention and time, and it’s perfectly acceptable to claim a bit of it for your own.

Whether you’ve carved out a quiet piece of real estate in your home (or more realistically a flat space) or bundled your laptop and supplies in a backpack so you can work anywhere, it’s time to honor and respect yourself enough to make that promise. I will make time to practice my art. A certain time on specific days, an hour a day, a specific word count for the day or week…whatever it takes for you to make it happen. And happen easily and consistently.

You can draw up a contract and sign it (which didn’t work for me…too easy to throw away and pretend it never happened, but it has worked for others) or you can buy something to commemorate the occasion. A special coffee mug, some business cards which are surprisingly affordable, a nice pen…anything that reminds you of your passion, your dream, your true self.

This isn’t a lifetime commitment to one project…it’s merely symbolic. You may have set your word count to 5000 words a week and you’re only reaching 3000, or only finding time 3 days a week instead of 5, that’s fantastic! Every single step is progress. Adjust your schedule as needed. Set yourself up to succeed.

Start a blog, write letters, write poetry, write in a journal, or tell stories. It truly doesn’t matter what you write, as long as you are writing. You might discover that those little doodles you make in your notebook are a lot of fun, and decide to learn how to draw as well.

I’ll be sharing some books, newsletters and websites in the following weeks that will hopefully give you lots of inspiration and ideas to keep that passion burning and keep you excited about being creative.

Until then, be kind to yourself, and enjoy your time, your passion and your life.

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Keeping a Writer’s Notebook

Every book on writing and every successful writer has one piece of advice that they all agree on. The importance of keeping a writer’s notebook.

There are as many ways of keeping a notebook as there are personalities in the world, so I’m going to share with you what has worked for me. I challenge you to try this for 30 days. Just 1 month.

Pick a notebook. It can be pocket size or larger, but choose one that you’re comfortable writing in and that’s easy to carry around with you. Hardcover or soft. Decorated or plain. Make it your confidant and take it with you everywhere you go. Eat with it, sit with it, watch tv with it, sleep with it. Take your time to choose something you really like. It can be a simple, cheap spiral notebook, a composition book, or a sturdier moleskine or similar version. I personally prefer Field Notes. They are small enough to fit in my back pocket, and sturdy enough to last the month it takes me to fill it up. Find one you’re excited about using and a pen that can keep up with you.

Now make it yours. Add stickers, draw on it, tape a picture of someone or something that inspires you on it, or leave it blank. To break the ice, put your name and email inside the front cover in case you lose it, and number every other page. You can also add a quote on the first page to get you started.

Use it as a journal, daily log, book of lists, ideas, bits of conversation, doodles, names or words you like, something you’d like to know more about, books, people or websites you’d like to check out, movies you’ve watched, and any idea that pops into your head no matter how dumb you think it is. Try not to tear out any pages though…there are no mistakes.

Now this is where the road diverges. Some people like to keep separate notebooks for everything, some like to add an index in the beginning so they can refer back to certain subjects or ideas later on, some like to separate it into different sections for different purposes. Personally, I’m a minimalist, so I like just one notebook to write everything in, and then I can always transfer anything worthwhile once the book is filled. A stack of index cards held together with a binder clip works for some people. It’s just finding a system that works for you and encourages you to use it. Pinterest is an endless source for ideas.

As I mentioned earlier, I use Field Notes, which are 48 pages of 3.5 X 5.5 paper. I force myself to fill up one every month. Some months are easy, and I’m well into the second one before time’s up, and sometimes every word is an effort. At the end of the month, I read through it and highlight anything I think is worthwhile or I’d like to refer to later. Or I rewrite it into another notebook that’s more long term. Moleskine’s are my preference then, but Leuchtturn makes a fine notebook as well. I like the process of rereading them when I’m stuck for ideas, and it also helps me notice what I pay attention to.

Whether you’re a writer, poet, artist, photographer, musician, or architect, that fantastic idea you just had or that perfect line of dialogue you just overheard will be gone within the hour. Write it down before it’s lost forever.

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