Category Archives: writinglife

It Doesn’t Get Any Easier, So Why Not Start Now?

You’ve got your notebook, you’ve got your passion, and now your final preparation is making that commitment to yourself. That’s right, to yourself. Everyone else gets your attention and time, and it’s perfectly acceptable to claim a bit of it for your own.

Whether you’ve carved out a quiet piece of real estate in your home (or more realistically a flat space) or bundled your laptop and supplies in a backpack so you can work anywhere, it’s time to honor and respect yourself enough to make that promise. I will make time to practice my art. A certain time on specific days, an hour a day, a specific word count for the day or week…whatever it takes for you to make it happen. And happen easily and consistently.

You can draw up a contract and sign it (which didn’t work for me…too easy to throw away and pretend it never happened, but it has worked for others) or you can buy something to commemorate the occasion. A special coffee mug, some business cards which are surprisingly affordable, a nice pen…anything that reminds you of your passion, your dream, your true self.

This isn’t a lifetime commitment to one project…it’s merely symbolic. You may have set your word count to 5000 words a week and you’re only reaching 3000, or only finding time 3 days a week instead of 5, that’s fantastic! Every single step is progress. Adjust your schedule as needed. Set yourself up to succeed.

Start a blog, write letters, write poetry, write in a journal, or tell stories. It truly doesn’t matter what you write, as long as you are writing. You might discover that those little doodles you make in your notebook are a lot of fun, and decide to learn how to draw as well.

I’ll be sharing some books, newsletters and websites in the following weeks that will hopefully give you lots of inspiration and ideas to keep that passion burning and keep you excited about being creative.

Until then, be kind to yourself, and enjoy your time, your passion and your life.

2 Comments

Filed under amwriting, Art, Creativity, Writing, writinglife

Keeping a Writer’s Notebook

Every book on writing and every successful writer has one piece of advice that they all agree on. The importance of keeping a writer’s notebook.

There are as many ways of keeping a notebook as there are personalities in the world, so I’m going to share with you what has worked for me. I challenge you to try this for 30 days. Just 1 month.

Pick a notebook. It can be pocket size or larger, but choose one that you’re comfortable writing in and that’s easy to carry around with you. Hardcover or soft. Decorated or plain. Make it your confidant and take it with you everywhere you go. Eat with it, sit with it, watch tv with it, sleep with it. Take your time to choose something you really like. It can be a simple, cheap spiral notebook, a composition book, or a sturdier moleskine or similar version. I personally prefer Field Notes. They are small enough to fit in my back pocket, and sturdy enough to last the month it takes me to fill it up. Find one you’re excited about using and a pen that can keep up with you.

Now make it yours. Add stickers, draw on it, tape a picture of someone or something that inspires you on it, or leave it blank. To break the ice, put your name and email inside the front cover in case you lose it, and number every other page. You can also add a quote on the first page to get you started.

Use it as a journal, daily log, book of lists, ideas, bits of conversation, doodles, names or words you like, something you’d like to know more about, books, people or websites you’d like to check out, movies you’ve watched, and any idea that pops into your head no matter how dumb you think it is. Try not to tear out any pages though…there are no mistakes.

Now this is where the road diverges. Some people like to keep separate notebooks for everything, some like to add an index in the beginning so they can refer back to certain subjects or ideas later on, some like to separate it into different sections for different purposes. Personally, I’m a minimalist, so I like just one notebook to write everything in, and then I can always transfer anything worthwhile once the book is filled. A stack of index cards held together with a binder clip works for some people. It’s just finding a system that works for you and encourages you to use it. Pinterest is an endless source for ideas.

As I mentioned earlier, I use Field Notes, which are 48 pages of 3.5 X 5.5 paper. I force myself to fill up one every month. Some months are easy, and I’m well into the second one before time’s up, and sometimes every word is an effort. At the end of the month, I read through it and highlight anything I think is worthwhile or I’d like to refer to later. Or I rewrite it into another notebook that’s more long term. Moleskine’s are my preference then, but Leuchtturn makes a fine notebook as well. I like the process of rereading them when I’m stuck for ideas, and it also helps me notice what I pay attention to.

Whether you’re a writer, poet, artist, photographer, musician, or architect, that fantastic idea you just had or that perfect line of dialogue you just overheard will be gone within the hour. Write it down before it’s lost forever.

Leave a comment

Filed under Creativity, freelancer, Writing, writinglife