Category Archives: Art

A New Year…A Fresh Start

For many years, I spent the end of December reflecting on what I’d accomplished, what I didn’t, and how it reflected the goals I had set for myself. It often left me feeling negative, overshadowing all the accomplishments and leaving the lingering unreasonable goals I had failed to meet.

What I discovered is by focusing on what worked and what didn’t work, what I wanted to accomplish versus what I felt like I was supposed to accomplish, it has brought me a much greater sense of satisfaction, motivation, and excitement. I constantly look for new sources of inspiration and additions to my daily routine or creative process to capitalize on this.

Life is all about change, about being open to new ideas, new opportunities, new methods. What worked in the past may not still work today, as we really are all a work in progress. The goals may be clear and defined, but how we go about reaching them can change with the tides and our unpredictable world.

The first week of the new year I ask myself one question…What would make me feel good about myself and what I’ve accomplished by this time next year? I then break those goals down into small steps, by month and then by week. I’m terrible with a daily to-do list, so I pick and choose from a weekly list. It allows me some freedom and helps me maintain some level of excitement about what I’m doing.

No matter how you set your goals or what path you take to accomplish them, show up every day, surround yourself with things that inspire you, and embrace your creativity and let it shine. Take note of the small things, always be on the lookout for new inspiration, and bend like a willow when life gets in the way.

It’s about progress…not perfection.

Wishing each and every one of you a very Happy, Peaceful, and Successful New Year!!

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What’s Your Perfect Day?

If you could map out your perfect day, what would it look like? Would it include a walk in the first light of the morning, a breakfast of cappuccino and croissants, and hours of uninterrupted writing or studio time? Maybe an hour or two reading blogs, or a great book with a cup of tea by your side? Sitting in a café in the afternoon, writing poetry and listening to your favorite music, or lunch with a friend, catching up and ranting about the state of the world? Would it include a lovely dinner prepared by you or someone else, paired with the perfect wine? An evening binge-watching Netflix, or a great movie, alone or with a friend?

How close is any of your perfect day in relation to your reality? Life doesn’t allow for us to live every day in perfect harmony with our wishes, but how can we adapt our dreams and desires to better fit that reality? Life is fluid, always presenting hurdles, obstacles, changes, new responsibilities, and difficulties, and we have to work extremely hard to adjust. All too often, what we really want to do gets pushed to the bottom of our never-ending to-do lists, and the day ends before we get there. The day always ends before we get to the end of the list. And it always will.

What would it take to add the elements of your perfect day to your life? There always will be things we absolutely have to do, but don’t we deserve the opportunity to spend some of our short time here doing the things we enjoy, fostering our creativity, making things, connecting with other people, giving ourselves a reason to be excited about starting the day? Isn’t it time to put some of those things closer to the top of the list? Maybe a walk three times a week, or a trip to the café once a week, Friday night movies, and however much time that can be blocked off for creative pursuits every day. Whatever we can do to incorporate the components of that perfect day.

“How we spend our time is how we spend our lives.” I’m betting no one’s last words were “I wish I spent more time on Twitter”. Our time here is short, and you really don’t have to go out and slay dragons every day or be completing tasks every minute. Think about the things that are truly important to you, things that you would regret not doing. We have no control over time, but we do have control over how we spend it. Just be yourself, and make time for who you want to be.

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22 Ideas To Fill a Writing Notebook

Now’s the ideal time to unwrap one of those notebooks you’ve been hoarding because it’s “too nice to use” and start filling it up. They look even better when they’re being used. Or just grab a cheap composition book from the drugstore. I’ve discussed the importance and value of keeping a notebook in a previous post, so I’ve compiled a list of ideas to do just that.

I personally don’t like having multiple notebooks going at the same time, so I just throw everything together and use one at a time. It makes for good reading and inspiration when the well is running dry (or I’m procrastinating), and I always find a surprise or two along the way that I had forgotten about. It also gives me insight into what I was doing and thinking about during that time span. Some people like different notebooks for different subjects or use index tabs to keep things separate. Others like Travellers Notebooks, where you can use multiple inserts and band them all together. Whatever is comfortable for you and makes it as easy as possible for you to write things down.

1. Quotes. I collect quotes from books I’m reading, websites, blogs, social media, TV shows, signs, podcasts, and pretty much everywhere. Just remember to note who it’s from and where you found it. A favorite quote is also a great way to break the ice and use it on the first page.

2. Books I’ve Read. Helps me make sure I’m doing enough reading, and I then add a 2-3 sentence summary and a rating of 1-5 stars.

3. Books I Want to Read. I always keep several books stacked up on hand, and this list makes sure there is no lag in reading material.

4. To-Do Lists. Current lists, soon, and someday.

5. Journal. You can make these entries as long or as short as you like. Even a simple sentence summing up the day. These help me keep track of my days, my work, my life, and my goals. I try and do a short paragraph on average 6 days a week at the end of the day. Some days I ramble on, some days it’s just a sentence. Even just a weekly summary will show you where you’ve been and what you’ve been up to.

6. Ideas for blog posts, articles, and books. I may think it’s the best idea I’ve ever had, but if I don’t write it down there is little to no chance of remembering exactly what it was. I’ll remember part of it, but not that perfect combination of words.

7. Every single dumb idea that pops into your head. Inventions, book titles, movie pitches, fan fiction…You can decide later whether it really is dumb or worth exploring further. Maybe a character in your next book might be thinking that same thing?

8. Recommendations. A list of books, articles, authors, websites, blogs, places to go, etc… Anything that sounds interesting that you want to get back to at a later date.

9. Words you really like, or a combination of words that sound poetic together. Like Sushi and cigarettes, or plastic personality.

10. Ideas for new creative hobbies. You don’t have to take them all up, or even try them, but it does give you a good insight into what might be missing from your life.

11. A list of everything you have that you love. It can be a close-knit family, a friend, the best pet in the world, a great neighbor, or material things like a really cool fountain pen, an awesome car, a super comfy couch, or a great sense of humor. Similar to a gratitude list, but much more specific.

12. Random interesting bits of conversation that you overhear or have had.

13. Goals. Short term and long term. What would make you feel really good about yourself by the end of the month or next year at this time? What would you like to accomplish?

14. Subjects that you would like to study. Anything you would like to research, know more about, or even become an expert on.

15. Things you would like to do for fun. A weekly poker night, a weekend exploring museums in New York, a trip to a Caribbean Island, or a week in Paris getting lost in bookstores. Like a bucket list, but there’s no commitment. It doesn’t need to be realistic.

16. A List of everything you’d like to have. From material things like a new coffeemaker or a new laptop to a greater number of close friends, or a mentor, or a significant other.

17. Every project that needs to be done around your home. Include what’s needed to get it done, and the steps involved. Get it out of your head and on paper.

18. Character Sketches. Keep a list of interesting quirks, physical characteristics, accents, names…

19. Submission list. Keep track of all work you submit anywhere, whether for pay or not, including date and copy.

20. Everything you can do to boost your self-care and be kinder to yourself. Don’t depend on anyone else to make you feel good.

21. Things you pay attention to. What gets your attention? Is it an image, a certain word or phrase, a setting, a type of musical score? What makes you stop what you’re doing and look or listen?

22. Things other people don’t notice, but everyone sees. From front doors to what people put on their windowsills, to stickers and flyers stuck to signs. What can you write about, or photograph, or draw?

There is an endless amount of information you can stockpile in a writing notebook, some of which isn’t outwardly related to writing. It’s a collection of bits and pieces of yourself, your life, your dreams, and your ideas. It can inspire you, help you stay on track to reach your goals, give you a jumping-off point for that next project, and maybe even teach you a few things about yourself.

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I Still Believe

I still believe that art can change the world.

I still believe creativity is the answer to living a better life.

I still believe that small acts of kindness can make a difference in the world.

I still believe that words are our most powerful tool.

I still believe in the inherent good of most of humanity.

I still believe embracing our differences does not divide us.

I still believe education is our hope for a better world.

I still believe that love is eternal.

I still believe there can be change if we stop being afraid.

I still believe that laughter helps us heal.

I still believe our differences bring us together.

I still believe that the energy we put out into the world is reflected back on us.

I still believe we can exist and respect our planet simultaneously.

I still believe that we can pursue our own happiness and peace without infringing on anyone else’s right to do the same.

I still believe that we are all equal regardless of our differences.

I still believe.

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Writer’s Block: Fact or Fiction

So many of the books written on the creative process try to convince you that there really isn’t such a thing as “writer’s block”. They’ll quote established writers from Ernest Hemingway to Stephen King, Agatha Christie to Joan Didion. All you need to do is show up every day, and just start writing. Sometimes it’s just crap and ends up in the trash, and sometimes there is some good in there that’s worth mining and exploring further. And I believe this to be absolutely true. Louis L’Amour advises “The water doesn’t flow until the tap is turned on.”

And there are many things you can do to stimulate the creative juices…establish a routine, take a walk, switch to a different medium, or read the work of others you admire. I’ve written previous posts about how to get that creative spark lit, about reinspiring yourself and training your brain to know when it’s time to get going.

But sometimes you hit that wall. And you hit it hard. You stare at that blank screen or page, you’ve tried all the tricks, you’ve rearranged and poked and prodded, you’ve begged for cooperation, you’ve paced and squeezed, and nothing. You can type words on the page. They’re flat and uninspired. There is no flow. You have no interest in what you’re writing, and neither will your readers.

I call this condition “creative constipation”. Forgive the analogy, but no matter how hard you squeeze, nothing is coming out. It can be traumatic when you write original content for a living, but there are times when you cause more harm than good by digging for gold in a mud puddle. It can also be tricky knowing the difference between “I don’t feel like working today” and “I can’t find the words”. Only you can tell the difference. When you’ve tried your best, when you’ve reached down to your very soul, when you’ve pushed yourself to your limits, and still nothing, it’s ok to just admit it’s not working right now and go do something that makes you feel good.

Taking the pressure off and walking away from the performance anxiety relaxes those overworked creative muscles and allows them to loosen up and recuperate. Writing every day without a doubt strengthens those muscles, and I’m a firm believer in pushing through most blocks. But just like any kind of exercise, knowing when you are doing more damage by pushing too hard can cause irreparable harm. It can make you avoid it because of fear and anxiety. It can keep you away for too long. It can make you question your abilities and your strengths.

Sometimes journaling (for your eyes only) can help you discover an underlying reason why things aren’t working. Are there distractions you need to attend to or feelings that you’re not addressing? Are you just feeling burned out?

Let the light back in and give yourself permission to take time for yourself. Fill that creative well back up again. Relax your brain. Read magazines. Plant something. Watch a funny movie. Take a day off from social media, which I highly recommend doing anyway, at least one day a week. Don’t waste precious time feeling guilty. Creativity is a fragile beast. It can be whiny and fickle and uncooperative. Show it some love, some attention, and some appreciation. Realize how lucky you are to have it. That wall you’re hitting is only right in front of you. You can keep trying to smash through it, you can try and scale it, or you can simply take a few steps back, give it the finger, and walk around it.

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You Are Your Greatest Work Of Art

You are free to do whatever you want. You need only face the consequences.”

-Sheldon Kopp, American Psychotherapist

How do you define yourself? Are you a Writer? A Photographer? A Sculptor, a Poet, a Painter, a Potter, a Yoga Master, a Chef? All too often, we describe ourselves awkwardly and tentatively, with a combination of explanations and disclaimers. It’s as if we don’t feel we deserve to use those labels. Our experiences have shown us that using them usually leads to being questioned with “Oh, have you written a book?” or “Have you had a show?” or “Do you have a YouTube Channel?” As if these were the milestones we need to reach in order to be considered worthy of the title. Imposter syndrome kicks in, and we suck those words right back up.

You have to want it, believe it, and own it. Who do you really want to be? Who are you now compared to that? What steps can you take to bridge that gap? What’s holding you back from being that person? You certainly don’t need anyone else’s permission or validation to be anything you want to be. There are obvious things that we cannot change, but we can change how we react to them. There are some changes that may take some time, but are you moving in the right direction? Can you envision yourself being that person and living that life?

Our capitalistic society is always pushing us to be more productive, accomplish more tasks, buy more material possessions, and fit in. The result is often anxiety, depression, exhaustion, and low self-esteem. Just maybe our to-do lists should include being authentic, being kinder and more supportive of other people, and respecting and valuing our own self-worth instead of just getting more tasks done.

You are the greatest piece of art that you’ll make in your lifetime. And each of us will always be a work in progress. Life changes and changes us in the process. Priorities shift, lessons are learned, goals are adjusted. Be careful not to lose yourself in the waves. Stay true to yourself, and it will show in your work. Create the person you want to be.

I’ll wrap this up with one of my favorite quotes from my mother, who always encouraged us to be whomever and whatever we wanted to be…

“Don’t be normal…normal is so boring.” -Selma Bersin

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Some Weeks Are Better Than Others…

Grant Snider

Petrea Hansen-Adamidis

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Top 10 Newsletters For Writers and Everyone Needing Some Creative Inspiration

Here’s a list I’ve compiled of some of my favorite inspiring, informative, and encouraging newsletters for writers and everyone interested in a little creative inspiration. All are free, and 1 or 2 offer paid subscriptions for more posts.  Greater input means greater output. Or they just make great fodder for further procrastination.

1. The Paris Review has been in existence since 1953 and showcases the best the literary world has to offer. It’s filled with short stories, interviews, and poetry, both current as well as from the last century, that are both inspiring and enlightening. Subscriptions to the newsletter are free, and there are several options to choose from. Well worth the time to read both the latest and those from the archives.

2. 10 Things Worth Sharing is a weekly newsletter from Austin Kleon, best-selling author of Steal Like An Artist, Show Your Work, and Keep Going. His blog, which he adds to almost daily, is just one of the most interesting and thought-provoking collections of information, book reviews, music, movies, ideas, and ruminations on life. I’ve learned so much from his work, and the info he provides has led me to so many new people and ideas to research further.

3. The Imperfectionist is from Oliver Burkeman, the author of Four Thousand Weeks. He is a productivity guru with a fantastic insight into just what productivity is, understanding our limits, and explaining how to accomplish the truly important goals in our lives. His newsletter is a reminder of how to keep things in perspective and stop spinning our wheels trying to do the impossible.

4. Craft Talk comes by way of Jami Attenberg, author and essayist. She also promotes the writing challenge #1000words of summer, and several more random writing challenges throughout the year. Her newsletter is an honest, open window into the everyday life of a best-selling author and the challenges, hard work, and rewards it offers. She also provides advice to authors at every stage of their work.

5. The Art of Noticing from the book of the same name, is by Rob Walker. One of the most important parts of exercising creativity comes from our ability to use all our senses to notice what most people overlook, and his newsletter provides all the prompts that will inspire and challenge you to do just that. He has a very relaxed, easy-to-read style of writing.

6. Internet Archive is a digital, non-profit library of free books, movies, music, videos, software, and more. Their archive is beyond extensive; they are the largest digital library in the world. The newsletter highlights some of their accomplishments, new additions, and progress in their journey to digitizing basically everything.

7. Subtle Maneuvers is a twice-monthly newsletter from Mason Currey, author of Daily Rituals. In it, he shares his thoughts, advice, and insight on how well-known individuals have overcome struggles, challenges, and time constraints and gone on to produce great creative works, and how you can too.

8. The Honest Broker is an interesting and informative weekly insight from music critic, author, and musician Ted Gioia. In it he shares little known information about music and culture, sharing stories and research collected over many years, and writes eloquently and honestly about subjects you can feel his passion for. I’ve made some great Spotify playlists based on his recommendations.

9. Iridescent Ordinary is a recent find for me. It’s by Rubi McGrory, and it’s a fun, lighthearted, and gentle approach to maintaining a daily practice. Delivered twice a week, it offers tips, workshops, playlists, meditations, and other reminders to step back and breathe. Good nudge for anyone trying to establish any type of daily routine, whether it be writing, exercising, or meditating.

10. Total Annarchy is a twice-monthly newsletter from author and marketing expert Ann Handley. It’s loaded with info on both writing and marketing. She’s got a great writing style, a great sense of humor, and a great reservoir of information.

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We Are The Documenters of History

We, the people, are the documenters of history. It is our stories, our artwork, and our photographs that future generations will look upon to get a true insight into our society. It won’t be Jeff Koons multimillion dollar balloon animals, nor will it be the latest best-selling novel, the current viral tweet or trending tik tok videos that they will seek out.

People are fascinated by the everyday lives and struggles of the “common” people. From the earliest cave drawings and logbooks of the first explorers, to the diaries of Civil War soldiers and a beautiful young soul named Anne Frank. From field sketches on the battlefields and poems scrawled on napkins to photographs tucked away in books. These are the words and windows we study to view what life was truly like.

The greatest artists and writers throughout history created works that have withstood the test of time. But we are just as fascinated by DaVinci’s notebooks and observations on life as we are with his creations. And the words of Charles Dickens are just as relevant today as they were almost 200 years ago. Truly great art survives, and so do the stories behind them.

But to dig even deeper, to see and read and feel what people were experiencing, how they were living and working, how they were reacting to what was going on around them, we turn to the “regular” people. The journals, the sketches, the photographs of everyday objects they put together for us. This is what allows us to get a true vision of their existence.

And that is why what we do today, by creating stories, by making our art, by documenting our experiences and lives and struggles and observations and reactions to what we see and hear, is so important. Document your reality. Your words matter, your art matters. Your journals, your blogs, your photography, your creations, they all matter. Your life matters.

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Find Your People

Putting your work out there can be very intimidating. Chances are, though, if it’s something you’re passionate about, there are other people out there who share that same passion. It’s just a matter of finding them, as well as giving them the opportunity to find you. Whether you join a community already in existence or gather people together and make your own, you’re not alone.

One of the few positives that social media has bestowed upon us is the ability to connect with others who share our passions. Unfortunately, most of the attention has been directed towards those that are harmful, contentious, and misinformed. But there really is good out there, there are good people all over the world, and the challenge we face is seeking them out and connecting with them. And in order to make that happen, you have to share your work.

Carve yourself out a space online, whether it be a blog or a website, and buy yourself a domain name. It’s always the right time to put yourself out there. You don’t have to be perfect, and your work doesn’t have to be either.

Whether you’re a writer, a photographer, a graphic artist, a painter, a musician, a jewelry designer, or anyone else creating something, there are others doing something similar. They’re just waiting for you to show your work, to share your passion and your process, and to offer up their encouragement and stories. One group often leads to another, and you will begin to become part of a community of like-minded creators. The deeper into your niche you explore, the better chance you have of finding your place and finding your people.

Every one of us fears rejection. And you will find those who don’t like your work. Probably tell you all about it too. They carry no weight or importance in your life. That’s not why you do what you do. There is no such thing as universal validation. The only validation you ever need is your own. It’s your life to live, your passions to pursue, your art to create.

Do what you do, always keep making things, and share them with the world. You’ll find your people.

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